Health and Wellbeing Themes

In November 2008, Professor Sir Michael Marmot was asked by the then Secretary of State for Health to chair an independent review to propose the most effective evidence-based strategies for reducing health inequalities in England from 2010.

The final report, 'Fair Society Healthy Lives', concluded that reducing health inequalities would require action on six policy objectives:

  1. Give every child the best start in life
  2. Enable all children, young people and adults to maximise their capabilities and have control over their lives
  3. Create fair employment and good work for all
  4. Ensure healthy standard of living for all
  5. Create and develop healthy and sustainable places and communities
  6. Strengthen the role and impact of ill-health prevention.

In Solihull we have adopted the Marmot Framework for the local Joint Strategic Needs Assessment and the Health and Wellbeing Strategy. In addition to this we have adopted an additional local priority to reflect the needs of our older population - Ageing Well Ensure People Receive the Care and Support they need across the Life Course.

This page provides information of why each of these policy areas is a priority for Solihull and access to some key related data and resources.

Give Every Child the Best Start in Life - Starting Well

Breaking the link between early disadvantage and poor outcomes in later life can only be achieved by ensuring that all children receive the best possible start in life. Reducing inequalities across maternal and infant health as well as early years’ education and development are among the key factors in this overall objective.

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority

The Local Authority Interactive Tool (LAIT) compares data related to children and young people across all local authorities in England. It can also be used to make comparisons over time. The tool includes data on: looked-after children, child protection, pupil attainment, children’s health, post-16 circumstances and judgements from school inspectors. To access the LAIT click here.

Enable All Children, Young People and Adults to Maximise Their Capabilities and Have Control over Their Lives - Developing Well

In order for people to maximise their capabilities and have control over their lives they must have the tools with which to make informed choices about their own health and care needs and have access to services that are tailored to fit their needs. In terms of providing people with the tools to make informed choices providing children and young people with the best start in life and education are critical.

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority 

Create Fair Employment and Good Work for All - Working Well

Being out of work can have a detrimental effect on an individual’s physical and mental health and wellbeing. In turn poor health and disability can prevent individuals from gaining secure and stable employment. Unemployment is a significant risk factor for a number of health indicators, and the effects can be linked to poverty and low income amongst the unemployed. There are also significant psychological consequences from being out of work, especially for the long-term unemployed. In addition, work can play an important role in an individual’s social networks and participation in society. Multi-stranded employment programmes are therefore essential to promote access to work and reduce long-term unemployment, particularly among disadvantaged groups and young people.

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority

Ensure a Healthy Standard of Living for All - Living Well

Solihull has comparatively low levels of households in poverty; however levels of poverty are considerably higher in the North Solihull Regeneration area where a third of households are living in relative poverty. Inflation and the recession have both increased poverty levels.

Employment status is the key determinant of poverty, with the unemployed and those in low paid work the most vulnerable. Neighbourhoods with high levels of relative poverty are subject to a range of inequalities, including:

  • Poor health outcomes/lifestyle choices; 
  • Higher crime and Anti-Social Behaviour rates; 
  • Higher rates of teenage conceptions and lone parents; 
  • Below average education attainment; 
  • Higher levels of debt and demand for debt/money advice services; 
  • Low self esteem and educational aspirations among children and young people. 

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority

Create and Develop Healthy and Sustainable Places and Communities - Living Well

Strong communities are characterised by a pride in where they live, however building such communities is a shared responsibility which requires a long-term approach.

Personal safety, the reduction of crime and anti-social behaviour, and associated harm, are amongst the greatest causes of concern for our communities. It affects quality of life and the way people think about the area in which they live, visit or work. Improving community safety requires a whole system approach including law enforcement, education and neighbourhood management and planning.

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority

Strengthen the Role and Impact of Ill Health Prevention - Living Well

Lifestyles are a major contributor towards the pattern of health inequalities in Solihull. Smoking alone is responsible for half of the difference in life expectancy between north and south Solihull. Life expectancy is directly correlated to the number of unhealthy lifestyle behaviours that a person engages in. People who engage in all four unhealthy lifestyle behaviours live an average of 14 years less than those who engage in none (EPIC 2011).

Evidence from the recent report by The King's Fund, Clustering of Unhealthy Lifestyle behaviours over time (2012), highlights how although multiple healthy lifestyle behaviours have improved across the population as a whole, for those in the lowest socio economic groups the change has been much less significant. This issue can only be adequately addressed when targeted, integrated, sustainable programmes are developed that reduce health inequalities and are accessible by those in most need.

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority

Ensure people receive the care and support they need across the life course - Ageing Well

Nationally, those aged 85 and over currently represent the fastest growing section of society, doubling between 1984 and 2009 and projected to increase by a further 2.5 times by 2034, accounting for 5% of the total population. For many, extended retirement years offer new opportunities in terms of increased financial and social freedom, however the number of older people in the UK in need of care and support is expected to soar by 1.7 million over the next 20 years and the number with dementia could double in 30 years.

Why is this a priority in Solihull?

Key resources for this priority

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